Technology

HitchBOT Shows That Robots Can Trust Humans With Cross-Canada Journey

Tech Crunch - Tue, 2014-08-19 17:01
 A project cosponsored by a group of Canadian universities, startups and Microsoft Azure has resulted in a robot named HitchBOT successfully making its way across Canada, beginning its journey in Halifax on the country’s eastern coast and ending in Victoria, British Columbia on the edge of the Pacific Ocean. The project saw a rudimentary robot depending completely on strangers willing to… Read More
Categories: Technology

These Bhutanese Postal Stamps Play Like Real Vinyl Records

Gizmodo UK - Tue, 2014-08-19 17:00
They'd legally get your letter where it needed to go, and play the country's national anthem (yes, really!).
Categories: Technology

This Is The Worst App In The World

Tech Crunch - Tue, 2014-08-19 16:32
 If you set out to build an incredibly annoying application, what would you create? If you are Daniel Zarick and Benedict Fritz, the answer to that question is The Shakedown. The app, borne out of Zarick’s torrid fever dream, is what he described in an email as “the dumbest idea [he] could imagine.” The Shakedown is so bad, it’s almost good. Kidding, it’s… Read More
Categories: Technology

How to Read Text in Binary

Gizmodo UK - Tue, 2014-08-19 16:30
Here's your new nerdy party trick.
Categories: Technology

Mailbox Finally Brings Its Email Client To The Desktop, Adds Drafts And Syncing Between Devices

Tech Crunch - Tue, 2014-08-19 16:00
 Mailbox, the ultra-awesome email client owned by Dropbox, is making its way onto the desktop. By doing so, it’ll be coming full circle and providing a seamless user experience on all the devices you’d want to view and respond to email on. Read More
Categories: Technology

Chartio’s New Data Pipeline Makes Analyzing And Visualizing Data Easier

Tech Crunch - Tue, 2014-08-19 16:00
 Chartio, a business intelligence service that lets you explore your data from a wide variety of sources, is launching a new service today that should make getting started with data analysis and visualization quite a bit easier. Read More
Categories: Technology

PayPal Wants You To Never Pull Out Your Credit Card Again

Read Write Web - Tue, 2014-08-19 16:00

A year ago, Bill Ready was gunning for PayPal, bragging about how his company, Braintree Payments, was winning customers like TaskRabbit away from the eBay-owned payments giant. 

Though Braintree was small, it was popular with mobile-app developers like Uber and HotelTonight—and he was using his edge with them to cook up a plan for a mobile wallet that could squeeze PayPal out of the world of mobile commerce.

See also: Braintree's Reverse Takeover Of PayPal Has Begun

Now Ready is working for PayPal, which bought his company last year for $800 million—and he's putting his PayPal-killer plan to work making PayPal a killer product.

One Touch Payments: The Cure For "Mobile Flu"?

On Wednesday, Braintree announced the arrival of One Touch Payments, a service that lets any Braintree-powered app tap into credit cards a user has already stored with another app in the Braintree family.

Crucially, the family of One Touch-enabled apps include PayPal's own mobile app, used by millions of users, most of whom have a credit or debit card stored with the service.

It will allow for swift mobile purchases without requiring users to create an account on an e-commerce site and enter credit-card details every time they want to buy something.

That cumbersome process is holding mobile commerce back, Ready believes. As usage shifts from desktop to mobile, e-commerce companies are experiencing what he calls "mobile flu."

"More than half of the shopping is going on mobile, but it's shopping not buying," Ready says. "We think there's a better authentication model than username and password."

Here are some screenshots that show how One Touch works:

Apps with One Touch Payments will let users check out with PayPal quickly on a mobile device.

The program is starting out in beta testing now, but will be widely available in a month, Ready says.

Why Braintree Needed PayPal, Too

The inclusion of PayPal's app will provide the critical mass for One Touch to have a chance for success—a problem which stymied Ready when Braintree was independent.

One Touch Payments began life as Venmo Touch, named after the person-to-person payment service Braintree bought in 2012. At the time, Ready's strategy was to combine Venmo's reach with consumers, who used its cash-sending features to split restaurant bills and chip in for gifts, with Braintree's reach among developers.

Venmo would serve as the wallet that stored payment accounts and shared them from app to app, while Braintree's software would let merchants tap into that wallet. Or one Braintree-powered app could just share a stored card with another app, with the user's permission.

Ready faced a chicken-and-egg problem, though: Until enough consumers had Venmo or another Braintree app, developers wouldn't be interested in playing along with the wallet scheme. And until enough apps worked with Venmo Touch, consumers wouldn't see the point in allowing Braintree to store and share their cards from app to app. Ready's one-touch payment dreams was stalled.

Along came PayPal, which was interested in Braintree for a host of reasons, particularly its reach among mobile developers.

After PayPal bought Braintree, Ready had the Venmo Touch retool the software to use either the PayPal or Venmo app as a wallet—and add PayPal itself, with its stored balance and PayPal Credit loans, as payment options.

Braintree also came up with new software for developers, the V.zero SDK, which supports One Touch Payments with minimal work by app builders. (If One Touch Payments is meant to simplify entering payment information for consumers, think of V.zero as doing something similar for developers adding payment features to their apps.)

One feature Ready's particularly excited about is Braintree's fraud detection, which he thinks will eliminate a lot of frustration with blocked payments. The current fraud model involves card networks declining a transaction, leaving both customer and merchant frustrated. Braintree's software, when it detects strange activity, will quiz a user on his or her mobile device before the transaction is finished.

"Stealing Fire From The Mountain"

Even though Ready is part of a big company now, his heart is still with small software developers who wouldn't be able to build features like fraud detection on their own.

"It wasn't long ago that we were having conversations with Uber's first engineer," says Ready. (The on-demand transportation company is a longtime Braintree customer.) The ease of storing a credit card with Uber, and then being able to walk out of a car and have the ride paid for automatically, is a key part of the service's success—and that's part of the "magic" Ready wants to replicate with other mobile apps that sign up with Braintree.

Selling to PayPal was a key part of making his plan happen, he said, because he saw a narrow window of opportunity to seize the mobile market.

"I did look at this as stealing fire from on top the mountain to give it to the masses," Ready says. "This moment in time is fleeting. Either we're going to give power to the masses, or people are going to concentrate purchases with a few large retailers."

There's an irony there, of course: At eBay, Ready is now working for one of those large retailers. 

Categories: Technology

PayPal Wants You To Never Pull Out Your Credit Card Again

Read Write Web - Tue, 2014-08-19 16:00

A year ago, Bill Ready was gunning for PayPal, bragging about how his company, Braintree Payments, was winning customers like TaskRabbit away from the eBay-owned payments giant. 

Though Braintree was small, it was popular with mobile-app developers like Uber and HotelTonight—and he was using his edge with them to cook up a plan for a mobile wallet that could squeeze PayPal out of the world of mobile commerce.

See also: Braintree's Reverse Takeover Of PayPal Has Begun

Now Ready is working for PayPal, which bought his company last year for $800 million—and he's putting his PayPal-killer plan to work making PayPal a killer product.

One Touch Payments: The Cure For "Mobile Flu"?

On Wednesday, Braintree announced the arrival of One Touch Payments, a service that lets any Braintree-powered app tap into credit cards a user has already stored with another app in the Braintree family.

Crucially, the family of One Touch-enabled apps include PayPal's own mobile app, used by millions of users, most of whom have a credit or debit card stored with the service.

It will allow for swift mobile purchases without requiring users to create an account on an e-commerce site and enter credit-card details every time they want to buy something.

That cumbersome process is holding mobile commerce back, Ready believes. As usage shifts from desktop to mobile, e-commerce companies are experiencing what he calls "mobile flu."

"More than half of the shopping is going on mobile, but it's shopping not buying," Ready says. "We think there's a better authentication model than username and password."

Here are some screenshots that show how One Touch works:

Apps with One Touch Payments will let users check out with PayPal quickly on a mobile device.

The program is starting out in beta testing now, but will be widely available in a month, Ready says.

Why Braintree Needed PayPal, Too

The inclusion of PayPal's app will provide the critical mass for One Touch to have a chance for success—a problem which stymied Ready when Braintree was independent.

One Touch Payments began life as Venmo Touch, named after the person-to-person payment service Braintree bought in 2012. At the time, Ready's strategy was to combine Venmo's reach with consumers, who used its cash-sending features to split restaurant bills and chip in for gifts, with Braintree's reach among developers.

Venmo would serve as the wallet that stored payment accounts and shared them from app to app, while Braintree's software would let merchants tap into that wallet. Or one Braintree-powered app could just share a stored card with another app, with the user's permission.

Ready faced a chicken-and-egg problem, though: Until enough consumers had Venmo or another Braintree app, developers wouldn't be interested in playing along with the wallet scheme. And until enough apps worked with Venmo Touch, consumers wouldn't see the point in allowing Braintree to store and share their cards from app to app. Ready's one-touch payment dreams was stalled.

Along came PayPal, which was interested in Braintree for a host of reasons, particularly its reach among mobile developers.

After PayPal bought Braintree, Ready had the Venmo Touch retool the software to use either the PayPal or Venmo app as a wallet—and add PayPal itself, with its stored balance and PayPal Credit loans, as payment options.

Braintree also came up with new software for developers, the V.zero SDK, which supports One Touch Payments with minimal work by app builders. (If One Touch Payments is meant to simplify entering payment information for consumers, think of V.zero as doing something similar for developers adding payment features to their apps.)

One feature Ready's particularly excited about is Braintree's fraud detection, which he thinks will eliminate a lot of frustration with blocked payments. The current fraud model involves card networks declining a transaction, leaving both customer and merchant frustrated. Braintree's software, when it detects strange activity, will quiz a user on his or her mobile device before the transaction is finished.

"Stealing Fire From The Mountain"

Even though Ready is part of a big company now, his heart is still with small software developers who wouldn't be able to build features like fraud detection on their own.

"It wasn't long ago that we were having conversations with Uber's first engineer," says Ready. (The on-demand transportation company is a longtime Braintree customer.) The ease of storing a credit card with Uber, and then being able to walk out of a car and have the ride paid for automatically, is a key part of the service's success—and that's part of the "magic" Ready wants to replicate with other mobile apps that sign up with Braintree.

Selling to PayPal was a key part of making his plan happen, he said, because he saw a narrow window of opportunity to seize the mobile market.

"I did look at this as stealing fire from on top the mountain to give it to the masses," Ready says. "This moment in time is fleeting. Either we're going to give power to the masses, or people are going to concentrate purchases with a few large retailers."

There's an irony there, of course: At eBay, Ready is now working for one of those large retailers. 

Categories: Technology

Rabbit Lets You Watch Videos With Friends, No Matter Where They Are

Gizmodo UK - Tue, 2014-08-19 16:00
Rabbit's creators say the software is also great for sharing documents, playing games, co-browsing with a friend, or text chatting if someone doesn't have a microphone handy.
Categories: Technology

With Mailbox For Desktop, We May All Live At The Post Office Again

Read Write Web - Tue, 2014-08-19 16:00

After years of grieving Eudora, my beloved but long-lost desktop-email client, I've found a replacement. It's called Mailbox.

Starting Tuesday, more people will be able to get their hands on it. Dropbox, which bought Mailbox last year, is opening up its beta program a little wider.

I'll tell you more about how you can get an invite in a bit. But first, let me tell you a story of love and loss.

Eudora: A Love Story

In 1995, when I was an intern at Mother Jones magazine, my then-boss, Joel Truher, introduced me to Eudora. For the next 16 years, I took Eudora everywhere I went.

Eudora has a charming back story: It was named after Eudora Welty, the author of the short story "Why I Live at the P.O." Like the protagonist of Welty's story, we live in our own personal post offices, deluged in digital postcards. While there have been attempts to kill off email, the truth is that it will never stop coming.

At Time Inc., my colleagues and I went through four email systems in the course of eight years. I figured out hacks to make sure that whatever bizarre system my overlords came up with, I could still use clean, simple Eudora.

It had spam filters. It had rules. I could "bounce" emails from one account to another, to deal with the annoyance of people sending work-related emails to personal addresses, or vice versa. And Eudora stored email in a simple, compact, text-based format, making search a dream—as long as I had my laptop with me.

Eudora's '90s look (via <a href="http://copper.net">Copper.net</a>)

I knew that Gmail was making desktop email obsolete. But I had a system that worked, and I was hell-bent on holding onto it as long as I could.

It was actually Apple, not Google, that killed Eudora. I wanted to upgrade to Mac OS X 10.7 to get some new wonder—probably iPhoto's Photo Stream feature. I didn't realize that meant saying goodbye to Eudora. Qualcomm, which had bought Eudora some years back, had stopped supporting the software, turning it over to an open-source project which promptly abandoned it. There would never be an update.

I tried to cope. Apple Mail was no substitute. I gave up and started redirecting one of my personal domains to a Gmail account, to gain the benefit of Google's spam filtering. And unlike Eudora, I had no way of consolidating my multiple email accounts into one interface. 

I hated Gmail disappearing under a mountain of browser tabs, so I created my own Gmail app with Fluid, a tool which turns Web apps into standalone Mac OS X apps. That gave me a little bit of the feel of an old-fashioned desktop email client. But it wasn't really the same.

More and more, I looked for ways to communicate that bypassed email: Twitter, Facebook, Campfire, Yammer, Skype, Slack, and others.

My most common routine with email these days: Select all. Uncheck one or two emails. Mark as read. Archive. If I were Welty's postmistress, I'd be dumping postcards into the bins by the fistful.

Why I Love Mailbox (Despite All Its Flaws)

It hasn't been easy finding an email app I can truly love. I've been too wounded by bad relationships and messy breakups with bad software. I didn't know if I could trust Mailbox. I didn't know if my heart could open up again.

So we started out slow. Mobile-only, as most modern relationships begin. I learned to swipe right to archive, swipe left to keep. I could reschedule emails to appear at a time when I could deal with them.

It was beautiful. I fell hard for Mailbox. I even put up with its quirks and limitations. For months, I only used Mailbox to read email, because it didn't support Gmail aliases, a feature I require in order to send emails from my readwrite.com address. It sounds crazy that I'd switch back and forth between two apps like that, but Mailbox's central metaphor—the idea of delaying or rescheduling email, like a task to be completed at the appropriate time—was too perfect. It didn't help Gmail's cause that its iOS app struggled with performance issues.

Mailbox gradually added my must-have features, including support for aliases and services besides Gmail. I eventually deleted my Gmail app from my iPhone and went Mailbox-only. 

Mailbox-only on mobile, that is. When I got to work, it was back to my desktop—and back to Gmail. Occasionally I'd fish out my phone just to use Mailbox to reschedule an email to appear in my inbox later. If switching between apps just to get a feature seemed crazy, switching between devices must seem downright loony—but that's what I ended up doing.

Then came Mailbox for desktop. For the past six weeks, I've been living in a world where I go from Mailbox on my phone to Mailbox on my Mac. (At present, Mailbox is only available for Mac OS X.)

For email triage, Mailbox is a beautiful thing. But I still find myself switching to my handrolled Gmail app for a few tasks. Gmail's smooth integration with other Gmail services like Google Calendar and Hangouts is hard to miss. Mailbox for Mac also still has a few flaws which remind me of the early days of Mailbox for iPhone—it keeps forgetting that I prefer my readwrite.com email alias, for example.

I'm willing to forgive Mailbox these shortcomings, though, because I finally have an experience that reminds me of the good old days of Eudora. It takes me back to the time when I lived at the electronic post office.

What Mailbox Is Delivering

On Tuesday morning, Mailbox for Mac is getting distributed to a wider set of beta testers. 

Existing Mailbox users on iOS and Android will get an invitation called a "betacoin," and they'll in turn get three betacoins to share with their friends. It's a strategy of artificial scarcity reminiscent of the old system Google used to limit Gmail signups using invitations—and a spin on the waiting list Mailbox originally created for its mobile app.

Mailbox's clean interface is a relief for Gmail clutter.

New features include the ability to save drafts, as well as some improvements geared around desktop email, like better keyboard shortcuts.

When I sat down with Sean Beausoleil, Mailbox's first engineer in its startup days who remains a key member of the Mailbox team at Dropbox, I mentioned some items on my wishlist.

On top: calendar integration. On mobile, I find it fairly simple to switch between Mailbox and Sunrise, a calendar app, to set up a meeting. (Acompli, a Mailbox competitor puts calendaring into its mobile email client, an all-in-one approach I find overly complicated.) On desktop, though, I'd like a one-click switch between email and calendar, like the one I get with Google Apps.

Mailbox doesn't have any calendar features today, but it's clearly something Beausoleil and the rest of the team are working out how to deliver.

"When you communicate a lot, calendar is a natural thing" to think about, Beausoleil told me. "You can think of calendar invites as becoming derivative of the conversation, and not explicit. You can figure out when someone needs to meet based on what they're saying."

Mailbox for Mac's message-deferral tool is its key feature.

Another thing Beausoleil and the rest of the Mailbox team are thinking about is tagging. If you've ever been unable to find an email thread because your mental categorization of the conversation doesn't match the literal words that appear in its text, you know why this would be a good thing.

In Eudora, I used to maintain supremely well-organized folders of emails by company, mailing list, and subject. Most people didn't bother to use emails like I did—and email can only live in one folder at a time.

"Folders are where email goes to die," says Beausoleil.

Tagging isn't something Mailbox contemplated when it was a mobile app, Beausoleil said, but they're thinking about it now for desktop, an environment where adding keywords to make emails more findable makes sense. And it's a more flexible approach than Gmail's labels, which assume you'll only put email in a very limited set of categories.

I still miss Eudora. But I have hope that Mailbox can be a far better postmistress than Eudora ever was.

All I know is that Dropbox better not screw this one up. Because I can't have my heart broken by an email program one more time.

Photo by Billy Hathorn; Eudora screenshot via Copper.net; Mailbox screenshots via Dropbox

Categories: Technology

With Mailbox For Desktop, We May All Live At The Post Office Again

Read Write Web - Tue, 2014-08-19 16:00

After years of grieving Eudora, my beloved but long-lost desktop-email client, I've found a replacement. It's called Mailbox.

Starting Tuesday, more people will be able to get their hands on it. Dropbox, which bought Mailbox last year, is opening up its beta program a little wider.

See also: How Mailbox Scaled To One Million Users In Six Weeks

I'll tell you more about how you can get an invite in a bit. But first, let me tell you a story of love and loss.

Eudora: A Love Story

In 1995, when I was an intern at Mother Jones magazine, my then-boss, Joel Truher, introduced me to Eudora. For the next 16 years, I took Eudora everywhere I went.

Eudora has a charming back story: It was named after Eudora Welty, the author of the short story "Why I Live at the P.O." Like the protagonist of Welty's story, we live in our own personal post offices, deluged in digital postcards. While there have been attempts to kill off email, the truth is that it will never stop coming.

At Time Inc., my colleagues and I went through four email systems in the course of eight years. I figured out hacks to make sure that whatever bizarre system my overlords came up with, I could still use clean, simple Eudora.

See also: Innovating The Email Inbox—Without "Delete All"

It had spam filters. It had rules. I could "bounce" emails from one account to another, to deal with the annoyance of people sending work-related emails to personal addresses, or vice versa. And Eudora stored email in a simple, compact, text-based format, making search a dream—as long as I had my laptop with me.

Eudora's '90s look (via <a href="http://copper.net">Copper.net</a>)

I knew that Gmail was making desktop email obsolete. But I had a system that worked, and I was hell-bent on holding onto it as long as I could.

It was actually Apple, not Google, that killed Eudora. I wanted to upgrade to Mac OS X 10.7 to get some new wonder—probably iPhoto's Photo Stream feature. I didn't realize that meant saying goodbye to Eudora. Qualcomm, which had bought Eudora some years back, had stopped supporting the software, turning it over to an open-source project which promptly abandoned it. There would never be an update.

I tried to cope. Apple Mail was no substitute. I gave up and started redirecting one of my personal domains to a Gmail account, to gain the benefit of Google's spam filtering. And unlike Eudora, I had no way of consolidating my multiple email accounts into one interface. 

I hated Gmail disappearing under a mountain of browser tabs, so I created my own Gmail app with Fluid, a tool which turns Web apps into standalone Mac OS X apps. That gave me a little bit of the feel of an old-fashioned desktop email client. But it wasn't really the same.

More and more, I looked for ways to communicate that bypassed email: Twitter, Facebook, Campfire, Yammer, Skype, Slack, and others.

My most common routine with email these days: Select all. Uncheck one or two emails. Mark as read. Archive. If I were Welty's postmistress, I'd be dumping postcards into the bins by the fistful.

Why I Love Mailbox (Despite All Its Flaws)

It hasn't been easy finding an email app I can truly love. I've been too wounded by bad relationships and messy breakups with bad software. I didn't know if I could trust Mailbox. I didn't know if my heart could open up again.

So we started out slow. Mobile-only, as most modern relationships begin. I learned to swipe right to archive, swipe left to keep. I could reschedule emails to appear at a time when I could deal with them.

See also: Google To World: Encrypted Email Is The New Black

It was beautiful. I fell hard for Mailbox. I even put up with its quirks and limitations. For months, I only used Mailbox to read email, because it didn't support Gmail aliases, a feature I require in order to send emails from my readwrite.com address. It sounds crazy that I'd switch back and forth between two apps like that, but Mailbox's central metaphor—the idea of delaying or rescheduling email, like a task to be completed at the appropriate time—was too perfect. It didn't help Gmail's cause that its iOS app struggled with performance issues.

Mailbox gradually added my must-have features, including support for aliases and services besides Gmail. I eventually deleted my Gmail app from my iPhone and went Mailbox-only. 

Mailbox-only on mobile, that is. When I got to work, it was back to my desktop—and back to Gmail. Occasionally I'd fish out my phone just to use Mailbox to reschedule an email to appear in my inbox later. If switching between apps just to get a feature seemed crazy, switching between devices must seem downright loony—but that's what I ended up doing.

Then came Mailbox for desktop. For the past six weeks, I've been living in a world where I go from Mailbox on my phone to Mailbox on my Mac. (At present, Mailbox is only available for Mac OS X.)

For email triage, Mailbox is a beautiful thing. But I still find myself switching to my handrolled Gmail app for a few tasks. Gmail's smooth integration with other Gmail services like Google Calendar and Hangouts is hard to miss. Mailbox for Mac also still has a few flaws which remind me of the early days of Mailbox for iPhone—it keeps forgetting that I prefer my readwrite.com email alias, for example.

I'm willing to forgive Mailbox these shortcomings, though, because I finally have an experience that reminds me of the good old days of Eudora. It takes me back to the time when I lived at the electronic post office.

What Mailbox Is Delivering

On Tuesday morning, Mailbox for Mac is getting distributed to a wider set of beta testers. 

Existing Mailbox users on iOS and Android will get an invitation called a "betacoin," and they'll in turn get three betacoins to share with their friends. It's a strategy of artificial scarcity reminiscent of the old system Google used to limit Gmail signups using invitations—and a spin on the waiting list Mailbox originally created for its mobile app.

Mailbox's clean interface is a relief for Gmail clutter.

New features include the ability to save drafts, as well as some improvements geared around desktop email, like better keyboard shortcuts.

When I sat down with Sean Beausoleil, Mailbox's first engineer in its startup days who remains a key member of the Mailbox team at Dropbox, I mentioned some items on my wishlist.

On top: calendar integration. On mobile, I find it fairly simple to switch between Mailbox and Sunrise, a calendar app, to set up a meeting. (Acompli, a Mailbox competitor puts calendaring into its mobile email client, an all-in-one approach I find overly complicated.) On desktop, though, I'd like a one-click switch between email and calendar, like the one I get with Google Apps.

Mailbox doesn't have any calendar features today, but it's clearly something Beausoleil and the rest of the team are working out how to deliver.

"When you communicate a lot, calendar is a natural thing" to think about, Beausoleil told me. "You can think of calendar invites as becoming derivative of the conversation, and not explicit. You can figure out when someone needs to meet based on what they're saying."

Mailbox for Mac's message-deferral tool is its key feature.

Another thing Beausoleil and the rest of the Mailbox team are thinking about is tagging. If you've ever been unable to find an email thread because your mental categorization of the conversation doesn't match the literal words that appear in its text, you know why this would be a good thing.

In Eudora, I used to maintain supremely well-organized folders of emails by company, mailing list, and subject. Most people didn't bother to use emails like I did—and email can only live in one folder at a time.

"Folders are where email goes to die," says Beausoleil.

Tagging isn't something Mailbox contemplated when it was a mobile app, Beausoleil said, but they're thinking about it now for desktop, an environment where adding keywords to make emails more findable makes sense. And it's a more flexible approach than Gmail's labels, which assume you'll only put email in a very limited set of categories.

I still miss Eudora. But I have hope that Mailbox can be a far better postmistress than Eudora ever was.

All I know is that Dropbox better not screw this one up. Because I can't have my heart broken by an email program one more time.

Photo by Billy Hathorn; Eudora screenshot via Copper.net; Mailbox screenshots courtesy of Dropbox

Categories: Technology

PayPal Rolls Out One-Touch Mobile Checkout For Apps

Mobile Crunch - Tue, 2014-08-19 15:59
 Mobile commerce today is still challenging with complicated checkout flows that see users bouncing between screens, and having to tap out their personal information on tiny screens and keyboards. PayPal today is hoping to change that with the release of a new product called One Touch for merchants and app developers. Read More
Categories: Technology

PayPal Rolls Out One-Touch Mobile Checkout For Apps

Tech Crunch - Tue, 2014-08-19 15:59
 Mobile commerce today is still challenging with complicated checkout flows that see users bouncing between screens, and having to tap out their personal information on tiny screens and keyboards. PayPal today is hoping to change that with the release of a new product called One Touch for merchants and app developers. Read More
Categories: Technology

No More Words From TuneWiki As Vert Capital Pulls The Plug On Its Music Lyric App

Tech Crunch - Tue, 2014-08-19 15:59
 So much for being pulled out of the dead pool. TuneWiki, a popular social music app with millions of users that let people see the lyrics to songs they were streaming on Spotify and other platforms, may have finally sung its last song. After announcing in July 2013 that it would shut down, it then got acquired at the 11th hour, as it turned out by private equity firm Vert Capital,… Read More
Categories: Technology

Hands On With The HTC One (M8) For Windows

Tech Crunch - Tue, 2014-08-19 15:54
 The HTC One (M8), one of the best-looking flagship Android smartphones that launched earlier this year, just landed on Windows Phone 8.1.1 Packed with front-facing speakers, dual UltraPixel cameras on the back, a 5MP front camera and BoomSound internal speakers, the One (M8) is exactly the same as its Android variant. Read More
Categories: Technology

Today’s Best Reads From Our Other Sites

Gizmodo UK - Tue, 2014-08-19 15:50
Kotaku UK: Right now Silent Hill's demo is my game of the year | Ubisoft ditching last-gen after next year | My, my Zelda, how you have grown | Lifehacker UK: How to cut down on cable noise with your earbuds | This clever trick helps you spot boring Kindle books | Albums makes it easy to find and play full albums on your iPhone
Categories: Technology

Oh God, a Startup is Snapchatting the News

Gizmodo UK - Tue, 2014-08-19 15:45
On top of making short news videos on line, NowThisNews has started sending out news bulletins via Snapchat. Abandon all hope.
Categories: Technology

This LED Torch is Powered by Spherical Solar Cells

Gizmodo UK - Tue, 2014-08-19 15:30
Solar-powered torches are ugly as sin. But that's nothing that a multidisciplinary creative collective from Japan can't solve.
Categories: Technology

UniPi Is A Powerful Board That Can Control Your Smart Home

Tech Crunch - Tue, 2014-08-19 15:25
 In the near future we will all live in smart homes. Our doors will open automatically, our air conditioners will know when we are too hot, and our toilets will understand our deepest needs. And the device to tie everything together? The Unipi. Created by a pair of Czech engineers, Adam Škorpík and Tomas Hora, the UniPi connects to a Raspberry Pi and includes eight relays for turning on and… Read More
Categories: Technology

Check Out Five New Stunning Wallpapers From OS X Yosemite

Gizmodo UK - Tue, 2014-08-19 15:15
OS X Yosemite's developer preview had an update today, and with it came four new stunning wallpapers showing off various points in Yosemite National Park.
Categories: Technology
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