Trends

A Nice Compact Video About Ageing and the Global Differences

Futurelab - Mon, 2014-04-21 12:17

This is a well made short video you might want to use at presentations. Well made and makes some good points.

The BBC made this video based on the research by Pew. I wrote about the report a few days back. 

Tags: Dick Stroudageing populationfutureagegrey
Categories: Trends

RFID Wooden Flashcards Project The Story Of Poland’s Jews [Video]

PSFK - Mon, 2014-04-21 11:30

With so many people adopting touch screens as their main technological mode of interfacing with the world, it can be difficult for museums to continue to occupy a unique niche in the world. Museums are all about the collective experience, and interaction designers are increasingly looking for displays that offer different kinds of stimuli. The Museum of the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw recently enlisted the help of Polish new media art and design group panGenerator to offer an innovative way of viewing the museum’s vast archives.


The ‘Macrofilm’ system’s wooden RFID cards, which go inside a reader, create an old-school experience, but the huge ~9m long ‘ribbon’ made out of two monolithic composite segments is the star of the show, allowing a unique accompaniment to the exhibit’s tactile experience and making a spectacle out of the usually secretive process of trawling through archives. An openFrameworks application generates real-time visual content for 3 WUXGA projectors that illuminate the ‘ribbon,’ attracting the attention of passerby.


The flow of information is also controlled by an Arduino-based wooden scroll wheel, which offers an increasing amount of resistance based on how close the viewer is to the end of an RFID card’s data.

The central panel of the ‘ribbon’ has more pixel density, ultimately keeping the experience of reading information closely an intricate one. Archives, sometimes so fiercely protected, can now be a democratic, serendipitous experience – users are invited to pick out one of the wooden RFID cards at random, and you never know what they may find about their relatives or their country’s history.

Museum of the History of Polish Jews
[h/t] Creative Applications Network

Categories: Trends

RFID Wooden Flashcards Project The Story Of Poland’s Jews [Video]

PSFK - Mon, 2014-04-21 11:30


With so many people adopting touch screens as their main technological mode of interfacing with the world, it can be difficult for museums to continue to occupy a unique niche in the world. Museums are all about the collective experience, and interaction designers are increasingly looking for displays that offer different kinds of stimuli. The Museum of the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw recently enlisted the help of Polish new media art and design group panGenerator to offer an innovative way of viewing the museum’s vast archives.


The ‘Macrofilm’ system’s wooden RFID cards, which go inside a reader, create an old-school experience, but the huge ~9m long ‘ribbon’ made out of two monolithic composite segments is the star of the show, allowing a unique accompaniment to the exhibit’s tactile experience and making a spectacle out of the usually secretive process of trawling through archives. An openFrameworks application generates real-time visual content for 3 WUXGA projectors that illuminate the ‘ribbon,’ attracting the attention of passerby.


The flow of information is also controlled by an Arduino-based wooden scroll wheel, which offers an increasing amount of resistance based on how close the viewer is to the end of an RFID card’s data.

The central panel of the ‘ribbon’ has more pixel density, ultimately keeping the experience of reading information closely an intricate one. Archives, sometimes so fiercely protected, can now be a democratic, serendipitous experience – users are invited to pick out one of the wooden RFID cards at random, and you never know what they may find about their relatives or their country’s history.

Museum of the History of Polish Jews
[h/t] Creative Applications Network

Categories: Trends

What The Stationery of Iconic Historical Figures Would Have Looked Like

PSFK - Mon, 2014-04-21 11:00

To celebrate and promote the recent launch of MOO.com‘s letterhead product, the online print company has designed a series of personal stationery for iconic historical figures. The concept and design of the business cards and letterheads were created by MOO’s in-house creative team, who imagined how these famous communicators would brand themselves in today’s world.

Teresa Pereira, VP Brand and Communications at MOO shared, ‘Before the telephone was invented, letters were the main method of communication and were extremely powerful in shaping social, personal and even world events. Letters are still important, so it seemed fitting to consider how the writings of these fascinating figures from history might translate to the modern day.’ These specific historical figures were selected because of their roles as powerful communicators, and each has a distinctly recognizable set of personal traits and characteristics.

For example, Charles Darwin receives a personal brand identity that utilizes sketches of animals and specifies his genus and species, while Roald Dahl’s makeover incorporates a childish type and bright splashes of color. Another author included in the set, Jane Austen, is given a more subdued palette.

Check out some of the creative stationery below, and see the full set on the MOO flickr page.

MOO.com

Categories: Trends

What The Stationery of Iconic Historical Figures Would Have Looked Like

PSFK - Mon, 2014-04-21 11:00


To celebrate and promote the recent launch of MOO.com‘s letterhead product, the online print company has designed a series of personal stationery for iconic historical figures. The concept and design of the business cards and letterheads were created by MOO’s in-house creative team, who imagined how these famous communicators would brand themselves in today’s world.

Teresa Pereira, VP Brand and Communications at MOO shared, ‘Before the telephone was invented, letters were the main method of communication and were extremely powerful in shaping social, personal and even world events. Letters are still important, so it seemed fitting to consider how the writings of these fascinating figures from history might translate to the modern day.’ These specific historical figures were selected because of their roles as powerful communicators, and each has a distinctly recognizable set of personal traits and characteristics.

For example, Charles Darwin receives a personal brand identity that utilizes sketches of animals and specifies his genus and species, while Roald Dahl’s makeover incorporates a childish type and bright splashes of color. Another author included in the set, Jane Austen, is given a more subdued palette.

Check out some of the creative stationery below, and see the full set on the MOO flickr page.

MOO.com

Categories: Trends

9 Stories You Need To Know Today

PSFK - Mon, 2014-04-21 10:00

Toilet flushes could help power homes. Chemistry World

Nest to generate revenue from electric utilities. Tech Crunch

Facebook activism is not effective in creating change. CNET

Google app helps people to take horizontal videos. Gizmodo

Uber adds a ‘safe ride’ fee for UberX. Engadget

First ‘Open sourced seeds’ released by planters. NPR

Boy reported missing was an artifact of several fake Facebook accounts. The Guardian

View legendary British Pathe newsreel collection for free. The Verge

Wu Tang fans launch Kickstarter to buy the group’s new $5 million album. Fact

Categories: Trends

9 Stories You Need To Know Today

PSFK - Mon, 2014-04-21 10:00

Toilet flushes could help power homes. Chemistry World

Nest to generate revenue from electric utilities. Tech Crunch

Facebook activism is not effective in creating change. CNET

Google app helps people to take horizontal videos. Gizmodo

Uber adds a ‘safe ride’ fee for UberX. Engadget

First ‘Open sourced seeds’ released by planters. NPR

Boy reported missing was an artifact of several fake Facebook accounts. The Guardian

View legendary British Pathe newsreel collection for free. The Verge

Wu Tang fans launch Kickstarter to buy the group’s new $5 million album. Fact

Categories: Trends

Valuations?

A VC - Mon, 2014-04-21 09:10

I just listened to this podcast with Marc Andreessen, Chris Dixon, and Benedict Evans. And since the post I was going to write today is now delayed until tomorrow, I will simply run the podcast as my post of the day. Lot’s of great stuff in here. I particularly liked the bit (about 17.5 mins in) where Marc says “there’s no public market bet on bitcoin, there’s no public market bet on crowdfunding, etc, etc”.  We’ve got those bets and I hope we can share them with the public markets someday

Categories: Trends

Valuations?

A VC - Mon, 2014-04-21 09:10

I just listened to this podcast with Marc Andreessen, Chris Dixon, and Benedict Evans. And since the post I was going to write today is now delayed until tomorrow, I will simply run the podcast as my post of the day. Lot’s of great stuff in here. I particularly liked the bit (about 17.5 mins in) where Marc says “there’s no public market bet on bitcoin, there’s no public market bet on crowdfunding, etc, etc”.  We’ve got those bets and I hope we can share them with the public markets someday

Categories: Trends

How Milllennials Spend Their Money (Infographic)

Mobile Youth - Mon, 2014-04-21 08:48

How Millennials Spend Their Money (click for full size)

Also Check Out These 5 Youth Infographics 5 Ways Youth Are Critical to Tech Companies Today? * How youth influences the adult consumer market
* The impact of youth Super Influencers in marketing
* Our Mobile Future and the role of youth in shaping it
* Selfie Culture Explained: how can we understand the future of technology through how youth use it today?
* The 3 Reasons Youth Are Important to Your Business

5 Resources to Get Up to Speed on the Youth Market Today * Digital Native or Disconnected Generation: how can we understand youth today?
* Youth Buyology: The Why of Youth Purchase Decisions (manual)
* Youth and Word of Mouth Motivations (research)
* Facebook, Twitter & Instagram: The Role of Youth in the Future of Social Media
* The Mobile Youth: Voices of the Mobile Generation (book)
GET THE BOOK & DISCOVER THE MOBILE GENERATION
"A compelling exploration of how the mobile youth culture revolution is driving our increasingly social and mobile future"
- Derek Baird, Director Product Development, Disney

"This book offers instant texture to anyone confused by the core technology driver"
- Edward O'Meara, SVP Wunderman

"What makes this book such a great read is that’s it’s written as a narrative in the life of different young people around the world"
- Marc Kornberger, CEO Student Village

* Kindle/iPad version from Amazon
* Paperback from Amazon
* PDF download online
Categories: Technology, Trends

If We Are Going to Compete for the Future, We Need To Do These 6 Things

Futurelab - Mon, 2014-04-21 07:05

Success used to be simple. You got a good education, found a job with a solid firm, worked hard and saved. Then you raised your kids to do the same. If you did the right things, you weren’t guaranteed riches, but a decent life was nearly a sure thing.

Tags: Greg Satellchangefuturetechnologyeducationprogress
Categories: Trends

Mercedes Is Driving Dangerously, Chasing Customers

Futurelab - Sun, 2014-04-20 17:01

Brazen.” “Provocative.” “Exuberant.” What automotive brand comes to mind when you hear those words? BMW? Audi? Maybe even Porsche?

Tags: Mercedesautomobilebrand strategyDenise Lee Yohn
Categories: Trends

No One Really Cares About Your Great Idea

Futurelab - Sun, 2014-04-20 16:30

I stumbled over a great Q&A over at Quora. Someone asked about what to do with their great ideas and inventions so that they won’t get cheated. I’ve decided to reproduce the question here and the answer by Jimmy Wales, founder of Wikipedia, as I often get asked the same question but in many different ways.

The question:

Tags: ideasDesign Translatorinnovationexecutioninvention
Categories: Trends

ListenUp: A taxman tribute, our 420 playlist, DJ Spooky's #PrivateJam and more in the music we tweeted this week

Cool Hunting - Sun, 2014-04-20 13:16

Grace Jones: Me! I Disconnect From You Model turned new wave R&B diva, Grace Jones remains on heavy rotation at clubs around the world, but for many its her covers that stand out most. Jones reinterprets songs with a certain refined soulfulness that...
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Employee Equity: Too Little?

A VC - Sun, 2014-04-20 10:47

Sam Altman, who is now running YC, has a good post on employee equity that has been making the rounds this weekend.

He makes four observations about employee equity:

- employees don’t get enough

- the requirement to exercise quickly upon leaving is painful

- the tax treatment of options is closer to salary than stock

- companies don’t tell employees enough about their stock and related information

I generally agree with the latter three points. But I am not sold on the first point. We have seen some of our portfolio companies make very large grants to early employees and that ends up hurting the founder’s stake because investors factor all of the shares that have been issued into the valuation they offer.

This issue is getting particularly visible in silicon valley where the value of a top software engineer has risen considerably in recent years. Let’s say that you want to hire a top software engineer and are competing with equity grant offers from Facebook and Google where the value of the grant is $1mm. If you have a current valuation on your company of $10mm, then you have to offer 10% of the company to compete for that engineer. I am not saying the engineer isn’t worth it. She is. I am just pointing out how dilutive employee equity is becoming in silicon valley. We are seeing similar things happening in NYC and I imagine they are happening elsewhere.

Since I started in VC, the percentage of a company that non-founder employees owned was always in the 15-20% range after the team is fully built out. In recent years, I have seen that number creep up to the 20-25% range and if you extrapolate current trends out a few years, it could easily be 30%.

So I guess what I am saying is that this is a market we are participating in. And this market is becoming very competitive and a lot more transparent. The benefits of both of those things are accruing to the employees and they are getting more and more equity as a result. Sam may be looking in the rear view mirror with this first assertion. I think like many things, the market will take care of this problem. It already is.

Categories: Trends

63% of US teens Googled “How to Kiss”

Mobile Youth - Sun, 2014-04-20 06:52
TIMELESS BEHAVIORS

One of the most popular Google searches for teens is “how to kiss”.

One of the most popular Google searches for teens is ‘how to kiss’

 

63% of teens in the US, 56% in Australia and 52% in the UK have googled “How to kiss”.

Other similar Google queries:
“How to flirt”
“How to dress for a date”
“How to slow dance”

By: Jon Rawlinson

It’s easy to fall for the idea that new technologies are conducive to new types of social behaviors but this is far from the truth. Technologies change but our underlying behaviors remain timeless

What people share today on Facebook only differs slightly than what they shared in the days before social media.

The vast majority of what goes onto Facebook takes a familiar pattern, with behaviors predating the digital era by generations: travel, weddings, babies, graduations, family pics, relationship statuses and so on.

5 Ways Youth Are Critical to Tech Companies Today? * How youth influences the adult consumer market
* The impact of youth Super Influencers in marketing
* Our Mobile Future and the role of youth in shaping it
* Selfie Culture Explained: how can we understand the future of technology through how youth use it today?
* The 3 Reasons Youth Are Important to Your Business

5 Resources to Get Up to Speed on the Youth Market Today * Digital Native or Disconnected Generation: how can we understand youth today?
* Youth Buyology: The Why of Youth Purchase Decisions (manual)
* Youth and Word of Mouth Motivations (research)
* Facebook, Twitter & Instagram: The Role of Youth in the Future of Social Media
* The Mobile Youth: Voices of the Mobile Generation (book)
WHEN TECHNOLOGISTS OVERSHOOT

Too much innovation focuses on getting users to behave in new ways but this lies outside the parameters of their experience.

Often we think the latest technology has to be groundbreaking or disruptive but if you look at what people really want from technology, their needs are quite simple.

Perhaps it too tempting to emphasize the novelty of the experience and appeal to the need to create fun, exciting advertising campaigns that win awards. Perhaps for too many technologists, the idea of emphasizing the old when it comes to technology doesn’t make sense, but we have to understand that rather than “old” these behaviors stand for timeless consistency.

Innovation should focus on supporting users to evolve old behaviors with new technology within the existing parameters of experience. Email was made possible because people were familiar with telegrams, typewriters and mail. SMS was possible because of email and so on.

When technologists develop products for their market, they are often tempted to paint unrealistic scenarios about how users will interact. Many early attempts at internet video, for example, believed the medium to be a visual extension of the audio format. It was like voice calling, only better, a richer and more interactive experience.

The reality is that we began to use video not with these new behaviors but in old ways. The most popular forms of video chat we age old behaviors – passive communication and the simple act of observation. Teens began using video chat not to actually chat but to simply watch each other as they went on about their business from doing homework to watching TV.

It was just like being in the same room, like it used to be.

GET YOUR BOOTS ON

Technologists need to get out there more and start observing technology use in situ. By breaking down the walls between customer and technologists we can help reconnect our marketing with the real-world behaviors of the user.

GET THE BOOK & DISCOVER THE MOBILE GENERATION
"A compelling exploration of how the mobile youth culture revolution is driving our increasingly social and mobile future"
- Derek Baird, Director Product Development, Disney

"This book offers instant texture to anyone confused by the core technology driver"
- Edward O'Meara, SVP Wunderman

"What makes this book such a great read is that’s it’s written as a narrative in the life of different young people around the world"
- Marc Kornberger, CEO Student Village

* Kindle/iPad version from Amazon
* Paperback from Amazon
* PDF download online
Categories: Technology, Trends

Link About It: This Week's Picks : Lego Simpsons, Earth's new twin planet, a 13-year-old eagle huntress and more in our weekly look at the web

Cool Hunting - Sat, 2014-04-19 13:19

1. Vein$ Fingerprints aren't the most secure password—as any decent crime film shows, you leave them everywhere. Vein geometry, however, has been shown to be just as unique as fingerprints—even differing in twins—and could be a safer alternative. Palm-vein scanners have already been...
Continue Reading...

Video Of The Week: The Gotham Gal on TWIST

A VC - Sat, 2014-04-19 13:02

Last summer, The Gotham Gal went on Jason Calacanis’ show, This Week In Startups. I had never watched it until this morning. It’s fun to see two people who know each other well (they worked together in the late 90s) do a conversation. It’s an hour long but there is some good stuff in here.

Categories: Trends

Just How Old are Silicon Valley’s Billionaire Founders?

Mobile Youth - Sat, 2014-04-19 09:35

 

Source HBR

Last week, The New Republic published a lengthy exploration of ageism in Silicon Valley, the idea that venture capitalists discriminate against older entrepreneurs and that start-ups discriminate against older job applicants. The central evidence was largely anecdotal: several well-worn quotes by prominent techies talking up the innovative nature of younger founders, the struggles of a “fortysomething” entrepreneur in Boston, the thesis of an angel investor betting on older, overlooked founders, and the sociological musings of a plastic surgeon who has seen more middle-aged men coming to him to look young as a way to help their career. Nonetheless, it was enough for VC Fred Wilson to concede that, “Yes tech is biased toward younger people.”

That one of the industry’s most prominent voices wouldn’t even bother to defend it against the charge may itself be the best evidence that the start-up world has a real problem with age discrimination. Nonetheless, we were curious to know just how young Silicon Valley founders really are; is the myth of the pimpled, hoodie-wearing 20-something really accurate? So we set out to find age data for start-up founders, aware of course that this data was unlikely to tip the scales in the ageism debate one way or the other.

The data we collected confirms that 20-something founders are quite common among those who have built billion-dollar businesses.

The challenge with measuring age is that the data is relatively hard to find. Unless a founder has given his or her age in a magazine profile, or maintains a particularly public Facebook account, it’s hard to get age data without actually surveying entrepreneurs. But there is one clue to founder age that is often publicly available: the year they received an undergraduate degree, listed on LinkedIn. We decided to use this as a proxy for the age at which the founder was 22, under the assumption that this would provide age data that was accurate within a year or two. Unfortunately, LinkedIn does not include this data in its API, so we were limited by having to do manual research. We therefore picked a small but disproportionately influential dataset to examine: the founders of private, VC-backed companies valued at $1 billion or more.

Using The Wall Street Journal’s billion-dollar-club list, the Crunchbase API, and manually searching LinkedIn profiles for year graduated, we were able to generate a list of founders for 35 of the 41 start-ups, and to determine an approximate age for the majority of them. For those without graduation year listed, we scoured other sources and filled in reported age (from media profiles and the like) where we found it. The result was estimated age data for 52 founders, 71% of the individuals on our list. This, we believe, is a more complete picture of the age of today’s top start-up founders than what has been published to date:

5 Ways Youth Are Critical to Tech Companies Today? * How youth influences the adult consumer market
* The impact of youth Super Influencers in marketing
* Our Mobile Future and the role of youth in shaping it
* Selfie Culture Explained: how can we understand the future of technology through how youth use it today?
* The 3 Reasons Youth Are Important to Your Business

5 Resources to Get Up to Speed on the Youth Market Today * Digital Native or Disconnected Generation: how can we understand youth today?
* Youth Buyology: The Why of Youth Purchase Decisions (manual)
* Youth and Word of Mouth Motivations (research)
* Facebook, Twitter & Instagram: The Role of Youth in the Future of Social Media
* The Mobile Youth: Voices of the Mobile Generation (book)

The average age at founding in our dataset was just over 31, and the median was 30. Today, of course, these founders are quite a bit older, with an average age just under 39, and a median of 38.

Before trying to put this data in context, several caveats are necessary. First, because this sample includes a particularly successful (and therefore non-random) group of founders, we cannot generalize from it to conclude anything about entrepreneur age, or even VC-backed entrepreneur age, more broadly. Second, and more problematically, we were only able to uncover age proxies for 71% of the founders on our list. While the data presented here provides a richer glimpse at the age of successful founders than generalizing based on anecdote, and perhaps even better than some investors’ own pattern recognition, it nonetheless runs the risk of substantial bias. It may well be that founders who don’t list the year they graduated from college on their LinkedIn profiles are older, on average, than those who do. This possibility cautions against drawing hard and fast conclusions about even the founders of billion dollar start-ups.

So what can we say? Foremost, we can conclude that 20-something entrepreneurs are very well-represented among the most successful entrepreneurs. Even if our dataset is deeply biased in their favor, we can conclude that founders under the age of 35 represent a significant proportion of founders in the billion-dollar club, and most likely the majority. To visualize that, here is a breakdown of our data including the 21 missing founders:

Think of the data above as the minimum percentage of founders in each age bracket. If all of those whose ages we couldn’t find were 35 or older when they founded their companies, 46% of the entrepreneurs on our list would still have been under 35.

Our data suggests that founders on the billion dollar list are younger than tech entrepreneurs in general. A 2008 paper looked at a random sample of more moderately successful founders (sales in excess of $1 million and 20+ employees) and found an average and median age at founding of 39, with only 31% under 35. That contrast, between tech founders in general and founders on the billion dollar list, is confirmed by an analysis similar to our own done last year by a VC, which found an average age at founding of 34 for founders of billion dollar start-ups.

Those concerned with ageism will likely suggest that the relatively young age of founders in the billion-dollar club confirms that VCs are biased toward young entrepreneurs; skeptics of the ageism charge may see the data as confirmation that 20-something founders are disproportionately likely to build extremely valuable companies. While this data can’t settle that debate, it does confirm that many of Silicon Valley’s most successful bets have been on 20-something entrepreneurs.

We did uncover some data to suggest an appreciation by VCs for age and experience, however. We used the same technique to look at the age of the current CEOs and Presidents of the companies on the billion-dollar list, and this group is significantly older. (Again we were able to find age proxies for just over 70% of cases, so the same caveats apply.) CEOs and Presidents are 42 years old on average, with a median of 42.

Some of the difference reflects the fact that founders grow older while running their companies, but it also suggests that in many cases they are being replaced with older, more experienced leaders.

By way of comparison, the average age of an incoming CEO to an S&P 500 company was 52.9 in 2010. Even when it comes to installing older leaders, VCs seem to prefer the young.

GET THE BOOK & DISCOVER THE MOBILE GENERATION
"A compelling exploration of how the mobile youth culture revolution is driving our increasingly social and mobile future"
- Derek Baird, Director Product Development, Disney

"This book offers instant texture to anyone confused by the core technology driver"
- Edward O'Meara, SVP Wunderman

"What makes this book such a great read is that’s it’s written as a narrative in the life of different young people around the world"
- Marc Kornberger, CEO Student Village

* Kindle/iPad version from Amazon
* Paperback from Amazon
* PDF download online
Categories: Technology, Trends
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