Trends

James Dyson Wants To Clean Our Rivers With A Vacuum Boat

PSFK - Wed, 2014-04-16 15:15

Designer James Dyson has proposed a floating barge concept that uses similar cyclone technology to that found in his signature vacuum to suck up plastic and other floating trash from bodies of water.

The M.V. Recyclone barge is designed to first capture floating trash in a large net. It then sucks up the trash inside where it is shredded, processed and separated by types of plastic.

Dyson first wrote about the Recyclone barge in an article on Time, and hopes it can become a tool that can help clean up the earth’s waters. It can be used for cleaning up rivers to reduce the amount of trash that gets washed out into the oceans. According to Dyson, “by focusing on the polluted rivers, the M.V. Recyclone could tackle a concentrated stream of plastic, catching it before it spreads.”

The barge is still a concept and Dyson admits that it would still need to be prototyped, tested, and refined several times before it can become a reality.

James Dyson
[h/t] The Verge

Categories: Trends

James Dyson Wants To Clean Our Rivers With A Vacuum Boat

PSFK - Wed, 2014-04-16 15:15

Designer James Dyson has proposed a floating barge concept that uses similar cyclone technology to that found in his signature vacuum to suck up plastic and other floating trash from bodies of water.

The M.V. Recyclone barge is designed to first capture floating trash in a large net. It then sucks up the trash inside where it is shredded, processed and separated by types of plastic.

Dyson first wrote about the Recyclone barge in an article on Time, and hopes it can become a tool that can help clean up the earth’s waters. It can be used for cleaning up rivers to reduce the amount of trash that gets washed out into the oceans. According to Dyson, “by focusing on the polluted rivers, the M.V. Recyclone could tackle a concentrated stream of plastic, catching it before it spreads.”

The barge is still a concept and Dyson admits that it would still need to be prototyped, tested, and refined several times before it can become a reality.

James Dyson
[h/t] The Verge

Categories: Trends

Jagermeister App Captures Epic Nights On The Town

PSFK - Wed, 2014-04-16 15:00

It’s fair to say many millennials have had at least one shot of Jagermeister in their lives and if not have at least heard of the rather powerful cocktail the ‘Jager Bomb’ (a concoction of Jagermeister and Red Bull). It’s definitely a well-known brand, according to the Chief Executives, it’s the seventh-largest premium spirit brand in the world. The marketing brains behind this popular spirit are now on a mission to make the German brand a little more tech savvy.

Jagerbonds is their new app offering that captures every element of a night out, be it a Birthday, engagement party or a Saturday night ritual. The app has the ability to document and collate pictures, videos, status updates, likes, shares and comments from the whole group’s social media feeds, be it Instagram, Facebook or Twitter and transform them into a 30-second video reel reproducing all the shenanigans of the group’s night out.

The video is also accompanied by songs to further encapsulate the essence of the night from bands such as Fall Out Boy, Eli Young Band, and Paul Oakenfold and other musicians popular with the millennial generation. The app also gives this target group, who generally have the fear of missing out, a chance to feel part of the night, even if they weren’t there and ensures they don’t get left behind on all the gossip.

Executive Vice President of marketing Adam Rosen explains the thought process,

“We are always trying to think of innovative and exciting ways from a marketing perspective to connect with our consumers, and the key consumer is looking at beverages in a different way because everything is so based in mobile and being digital first and mobile first. We knew we wanted to be there, but we had to do it in a Jagermeister sort of way, which, from a consumer perspective, means a shot in one hand and a phone in another.”

Download the app here.

Sources: Clickz, iTunes

 

Categories: Trends

Jagermeister App Captures Epic Nights On The Town

PSFK - Wed, 2014-04-16 15:00

It’s fair to say many millennials have had at least one shot of Jagermeister in their lives and if not have at least heard of the rather powerful cocktail the ‘Jager Bomb’ (a concoction of Jagermeister and Red Bull). It’s definitely a well-known brand, according to the Chief Executives, it’s the seventh-largest premium spirit brand in the world. The marketing brains behind this popular spirit are now on a mission to make the German brand a little more tech savvy.

Jagerbonds is their new app offering that captures every element of a night out, be it a Birthday, engagement party or a Saturday night ritual. The app has the ability to document and collate pictures, videos, status updates, likes, shares and comments from the whole group’s social media feeds, be it Instagram, Facebook or Twitter and transform them into a 30-second video reel reproducing all the shenanigans of the group’s night out.

The video is also accompanied by songs to further encapsulate the essence of the night from bands such as Fall Out Boy, Eli Young Band, and Paul Oakenfold and other musicians popular with the millennial generation. The app also gives this target group, who generally have the fear of missing out, a chance to feel part of the night, even if they weren’t there and ensures they don’t get left behind on all the gossip.

Executive Vice President of marketing Adam Rosen explains the thought process,

“We are always trying to think of innovative and exciting ways from a marketing perspective to connect with our consumers, and the key consumer is looking at beverages in a different way because everything is so based in mobile and being digital first and mobile first. We knew we wanted to be there, but we had to do it in a Jagermeister sort of way, which, from a consumer perspective, means a shot in one hand and a phone in another.”

Download the app here.

Sources: Clickz, iTunes

 

Categories: Trends

Top Five Health Innovations Of The Week

PSFK - Wed, 2014-04-16 14:45

Each week PSFK.com with its partner Boehringer Ingelheim brings you a snapshot of five innovative ideas that are reshaping the health care industry. This week’s innovations include a ‘heart age’ calculator and a device that detectz cardiovascular disease from eye scans. Be sure to check out Boehringer Ingelheim’s FacebookTwitter and Pinterest pages to stay on top of all things health.

Study Finds Smartphone Apps Can Reduce Cardiac Readmissions By 40 Percent
The Mayo Clinic has found that incorporating a smartphone app into cardiac rehabilitation can reduce emergency room visits and hospital readmissions by 40 percent. the Mayo Clinic designed an online and smartphone-based program for patients recovering from stent placement for a heart attack, with 25 participants using the application and a control group of 19 had regular cardiac rehabilitation without the app. The app was designed to track patient vital signs and provide educational content on how to stay healthy. Around 60 percent of the control group was either readmitted to the hospital or admitted to an emergency room within 90 days. In the group that used the app, that number was just over 20 percent.

Heart Age Calculator Helps Users Get A Sense Of Their Cardiovascular Wellness
A new online calculator developed by the Joint British Societies has been developed to let people get a better understanding of their potential risk for a cardiovascular event such as a heart attack. The heart calculator takes a number of lifestyle variables into account, and comes up with a true ‘heart age,’ much in the way that one’s overall chronological age may be older or younger than biological age. The calculator is mainly for primary care physicians, but an app will soon follow for the general public to punch in their own variables.

Map Of Daily Heartbeats Provides A Countdown Of One Artist’s Life
Created by data scientist Jen Lowe, One Human Heartbeat is an experiment that visualizes Lowe’s pulsating heartbeat. Using the Basis watch to track her pulse, Lowe has created a live stream of her beating heart for all of the Internet to see, and even points out how many more days she is expected to live. has been measuring her heartbeat for over a month now and has revealed that based on the information provided, statistics show she has about 16452 days left to live.While the watch, as Lowe explains, “fails to record any heart rate” for an estimated 17.5% of the time, but it is still able to provide an account of her average heartrate per minute.

Eye Visualization Analytics Tool Can Detect Risk For Cardiovascular Disease
A team of Spanish researchers recently announced the development of a highly automated eye visualization system that detects highly nuanced characteristics within the eye and helps determine cardiovascular disease risk based on this data. The system measures the width of vessels within the eye and the angles at which they branch out. Using pulse wave transit time technology, real-time velocity of blood flowing through the vessels is detected. The data is then analyzed using specialty software and results obtained, hopefully without a professional ophthalmologist’s assistance.

Researchers Build An Artificial Heart With 3D Printed Organic Scaffold
Scientists at the Wake Forest Institute For Regenerative Medicine in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, have successfully demonstrated the ability to 3D print a heart using organic nanotubes. By utilizing 3D printing technology, researchers have the opportunity to very precisely combine cells and materials into the desired shape. The replacement tissue or organ can be designed on a computer using a patient’s medical scans. The computer then controls the printer as it precisely prints the desired shape and determines cell placement. The printers used also give the option of using two or more different cell types and placing them exactly where they need to be — something not possible by hand.

PSFK has partnered with  Boehringer Ingelheim to bring you a steady stream of inspiring news and ideas in the health and wellness space. Once each week, we will be posting an article on PSFK.com. If you would like to gain access to the full stream of content, please check out Boehringer Ingelheim’s FacebookTwitter and Pinterest pages, where they are publishing a regular stream of inspiring and informative content.

Categories: Trends

Top Five Health Innovations Of The Week

PSFK - Wed, 2014-04-16 14:45

Each week PSFK.com with its partner Boehringer Ingelheim brings you a snapshot of five innovative ideas that are reshaping the health care industry. This week’s innovations include a ‘heart age’ calculator and a device that detectz cardiovascular disease from eye scans. Be sure to check out Boehringer Ingelheim’s FacebookTwitter and Pinterest pages to stay on top of all things health.

Study Finds Smartphone Apps Can Reduce Cardiac Readmissions By 40 Percent
The Mayo Clinic has found that incorporating a smartphone app into cardiac rehabilitation can reduce emergency room visits and hospital readmissions by 40 percent. the Mayo Clinic designed an online and smartphone-based program for patients recovering from stent placement for a heart attack, with 25 participants using the application and a control group of 19 had regular cardiac rehabilitation without the app. The app was designed to track patient vital signs and provide educational content on how to stay healthy. Around 60 percent of the control group was either readmitted to the hospital or admitted to an emergency room within 90 days. In the group that used the app, that number was just over 20 percent.

Heart Age Calculator Helps Users Get A Sense Of Their Cardiovascular Wellness
A new online calculator developed by the Joint British Societies has been developed to let people get a better understanding of their potential risk for a cardiovascular event such as a heart attack. The heart calculator takes a number of lifestyle variables into account, and comes up with a true ‘heart age,’ much in the way that one’s overall chronological age may be older or younger than biological age. The calculator is mainly for primary care physicians, but an app will soon follow for the general public to punch in their own variables.

Map Of Daily Heartbeats Provides A Countdown Of One Artist’s Life
Created by data scientist Jen Lowe, One Human Heartbeat is an experiment that visualizes Lowe’s pulsating heartbeat. Using the Basis watch to track her pulse, Lowe has created a live stream of her beating heart for all of the Internet to see, and even points out how many more days she is expected to live. has been measuring her heartbeat for over a month now and has revealed that based on the information provided, statistics show she has about 16452 days left to live.While the watch, as Lowe explains, “fails to record any heart rate” for an estimated 17.5% of the time, but it is still able to provide an account of her average heartrate per minute.

Eye Visualization Analytics Tool Can Detect Risk For Cardiovascular Disease
A team of Spanish researchers recently announced the development of a highly automated eye visualization system that detects highly nuanced characteristics within the eye and helps determine cardiovascular disease risk based on this data. The system measures the width of vessels within the eye and the angles at which they branch out. Using pulse wave transit time technology, real-time velocity of blood flowing through the vessels is detected. The data is then analyzed using specialty software and results obtained, hopefully without a professional ophthalmologist’s assistance.

Researchers Build An Artificial Heart With 3D Printed Organic Scaffold
Scientists at the Wake Forest Institute For Regenerative Medicine in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, have successfully demonstrated the ability to 3D print a heart using organic nanotubes. By utilizing 3D printing technology, researchers have the opportunity to very precisely combine cells and materials into the desired shape. The replacement tissue or organ can be designed on a computer using a patient’s medical scans. The computer then controls the printer as it precisely prints the desired shape and determines cell placement. The printers used also give the option of using two or more different cell types and placing them exactly where they need to be — something not possible by hand.

PSFK has partnered with  Boehringer Ingelheim to bring you a steady stream of inspiring news and ideas in the health and wellness space. Once each week, we will be posting an article on PSFK.com. If you would like to gain access to the full stream of content, please check out Boehringer Ingelheim’s FacebookTwitter and Pinterest pages, where they are publishing a regular stream of inspiring and informative content.

Categories: Trends

Link About It: L’ArcoBaleno: Earthquake-proof tables, Brazilian modern, Brooklyn's Souda studio and more in the stories culled from the online market's cast of talent

Cool Hunting - Wed, 2014-04-16 14:43

Helmed by Design Miami co-founder Ambra Medda, L'ArcoBaleno is an extraordinary online marketplace for the cultured design enthusiast. To provide...
Continue Reading...

Never Miss The Bus Again With This Street-Projected Public Transport Tracker

PSFK - Wed, 2014-04-16 14:30

TransitScreen makes public transportation more accessible thanks to digital signs in universities and offices that display schedules and other key information for trains, buses, and even bike sharing services. Now they want to provide the same service to the general public, with projections on sidewalks, walls, and other areas that would include aggregated transport information, and even how to get to the access point for your chosen method of transportation.

Ryan Croft, one of TransitScreen’s co-founders, told FastCoDesign that building owners and business improvement districts are interested in how the technology can activate public spaces. “It’s a dynamic use of real-time information that cities haven’t seen before,” said Croft. “They really like it because it’s something that has such broad reach.”

Unlike similar services, there is no need to download a specific app, which may not even cover all of your chosen transportation methods. TransitScreen’s technology would also be accessible to people who are less technologically savvy, or tourists who don’t want to pay for an app that would only get used for a week or two.

Beyond convenience, the projections are also extremely intuitive. It tells you exactly how many bikes are available at nearby bike stations, how long before a ridesharing service would arrive, and in some places, even when and where the next campus shuttle bus will arrive. “We like to say we’re trying to make alternative modes of transit cool and easy,” says Croft.

TransitScreen

Source: FastCoDesign

Images: TransitScreen

Categories: Trends

Never Miss The Bus Again With This Street-Projected Public Transport Tracker

PSFK - Wed, 2014-04-16 14:30

TransitScreen makes public transportation more accessible thanks to digital signs in universities and offices that display schedules and other key information for trains, buses, and even bike sharing services. Now they want to provide the same service to the general public, with projections on sidewalks, walls, and other areas that would include aggregated transport information, and even how to get to the access point for your chosen method of transportation.

Ryan Croft, one of TransitScreen’s co-founders, told FastCoDesign that building owners and business improvement districts are interested in how the technology can activate public spaces. “It’s a dynamic use of real-time information that cities haven’t seen before,” said Croft. “They really like it because it’s something that has such broad reach.”

Unlike similar services, there is no need to download a specific app, which may not even cover all of your chosen transportation methods. TransitScreen’s technology would also be accessible to people who are less technologically savvy, or tourists who don’t want to pay for an app that would only get used for a week or two.

Beyond convenience, the projections are also extremely intuitive. It tells you exactly how many bikes are available at nearby bike stations, how long before a ridesharing service would arrive, and in some places, even when and where the next campus shuttle bus will arrive. “We like to say we’re trying to make alternative modes of transit cool and easy,” says Croft.

TransitScreen

Source: FastCoDesign

Images: TransitScreen

Categories: Trends

Buy an apartment in this Brazil complex, get a free USD 1,000 bike

Springwise - Wed, 2014-04-16 14:19
Add / Remove

Buying a home is already the largest single purchase many will every make in their lifetime, without taking into account all of the accoutrements that come with furnishing and decorating it. We’ve seen a number of businesses offering extras along with properties in recent times, including Canada’s World Housing, which builds a home for a family in need for every property bought. Now, Brazil’s newly-designed Huma Klabin construction is offering every resident a complementary fold-up bike.

Located in São Paulo, the building will be situated close to a number of cycle paths that make travel by bike a feasible option for those buying an apartment in the area. Anyone who buys an apartment in the Huma Klabin complex is offered a free fold-up bike worth USD 1,000. The company’s aim is to help reduce pollution and carbon emissions in the city, as well as help promote more healthy and active lifestyles. The building also features a number of communal features such as a gym and pool, as well as up to 70 bicycle racks.

The Huma Klabin complex has not yet begun construction, house hunters can contact the developers for more information. Are there other free gifts companies could offer to help improve residents’ quality of life when moving into a new home?

Website: www.huma.net.br
Contact: www.huma.net.br/fale_conosco








Categories: Trends

Bike Turns Plastic Cups Into 3D Printer Ink

PSFK - Wed, 2014-04-16 14:00

Any trip to the Museum of Modern Art is sure to include an exhibit that features waste turned into works of art. Like those artists, many of us are interested in creating beautiful things out of recyclable materials, but lack the time or the know-how to do so. Fortunately, Taiwanese design factory Fabcraft is making creative recycling a little more accessible.

Because 3D printers have become smaller and more affordable, the co-founders of Fabcraft wanted to find a way to bring 3D printing to the average person. They wound up getting some design plans and open-source software off the internet to build their own 3D printer, which they strapped to a bicycle and called Mobile Fab.

It has a workstation that grinds plastic cups (currently only No. 5 grade plastic) into a powder that is put into the 3D printer. The 3D printer converts the powder into an ink that is used to create gear-shaped tokens that are later fitted with LED lights and can be placed in bike spokes. The whole process takes about 2 hours.

The Fabcraft team bicycles around town asking people for their used cups and giving demonstrations on how the Mobile Fab works. They explain the many benefits of their creation, including reducing carbon footprints and pollution.

Fabcraft is hard at work on their next project, a larger Mobile Fab that they hope will be able to influence people to re-think how trash can be useful.

(h/t CNET)

Categories: Trends

Bike Turns Plastic Cups Into 3D Printer Ink

PSFK - Wed, 2014-04-16 14:00

Any trip to the Museum of Modern Art is sure to include an exhibit that features waste turned into works of art. Like those artists, many of us are interested in creating beautiful things out of recyclable materials, but lack the time or the know-how to do so. Fortunately, Taiwanese design factory Fabcraft is making creative recycling a little more accessible.

Because 3D printers have become smaller and more affordable, the co-founders of Fabcraft wanted to find a way to bring 3D printing to the average person. They wound up getting some design plans and open-source software off the internet to build their own 3D printer, which they strapped to a bicycle and called Mobile Fab.

It has a workstation that grinds plastic cups (currently only No. 5 grade plastic) into a powder that is put into the 3D printer. The 3D printer converts the powder into an ink that is used to create gear-shaped tokens that are later fitted with LED lights and can be placed in bike spokes. The whole process takes about 2 hours.

The Fabcraft team bicycles around town asking people for their used cups and giving demonstrations on how the Mobile Fab works. They explain the many benefits of their creation, including reducing carbon footprints and pollution.

Fabcraft is hard at work on their next project, a larger Mobile Fab that they hope will be able to influence people to re-think how trash can be useful.

(h/t CNET)

Categories: Trends

Kids’ book teaches young girls to code

Springwise - Wed, 2014-04-16 13:30
Add / Remove

Books still play a major part in the development of children’s understanding of the world, of which new digital technologies are most definitely now a part. We recently wrote about MakerBot’s LEO the Maker Prince kids’ book, which teaches readers about 3D printing, and now Hello Ruby is another title — this time designed to appeal to girls — that hopes to get them inspired by the web and programming.

Created by Linda Liukas, who for the past three years has been teaching programming and encouraging more young women into the field through the Rails Girls nonprofit, the book follows the story of Ruby, who meets penguin, snow leopards and green robots as she creates her own adventures. Although the book has a female protagonist designed to feel inclusive to females — who are lacking in the field — the book is for all genders. Alongside the narrative book is an activity book that lets readers learn the foundational structures of programming through puzzles. The video below explains more about the project:

Hello Ruby raised more than USD 380,000 from its initial Kickstarter target of just USD 10,000, and the hardcover book is now available to pre-order for USD 40, or USD 20 for the ebook. Are there other ways to get kids — and particularly girls — into programming from a young age?

Website: www.helloruby.com
Contact: www.twitter.com/lindaliukas








Categories: Trends

Ultimate Reality: Augmented reality's next step, tested in a recent media campaign for History Channel's Vikings

Cool Hunting - Wed, 2014-04-16 13:30

If you live in New York City, you might have seen big ads for the History Channel's "Vikings" program on bus shelters and phone kiosks; if you've noticed fans waving their cellphones in front of them, it means you've also spotted ...
Continue Reading...

Traveling Adventure Fortress Designed For A 4-Year-Old

PSFK - Wed, 2014-04-16 13:30

Bran Ferren, the co-chairman of technology and design firm Applied Minds, has developed a high-tech adventure vehicle for his four-year-old daughter Kira that they can use for exploring. The millionaire inventor’s 23 ton RV, called the ‘KiraVan’, is a six-wheeled, all-terrain truck that can travel 2,000 miles without refueling and can traverse slopes of up to 45 degrees.

The KiraVan features Kevlar-reinforced tires, drones to monitor the upcoming terrain, and a 31 foot long trailer. This includes an eco-friendly bathroom, custom-designed kitchen, and a ‘penthouse’ loft that Kira helped design. Ferren is hoping to travel to the Mojave Desert, Canada and possibly even Europe in the vehicle to show Kira different sights.



Sources: Telegraph, Wired
Images: Telegraph, Wired

Categories: Trends

Traveling Adventure Fortress Designed For A 4-Year-Old

PSFK - Wed, 2014-04-16 13:30

Bran Ferren, the co-chairman of technology and design firm Applied Minds, has developed a high-tech adventure vehicle for his four-year-old daughter Kira that they can use for exploring. The millionaire inventor’s 23 ton RV, called the ‘KiraVan’, is a six-wheeled, all-terrain truck that can travel 2,000 miles without refueling and can traverse slopes of up to 45 degrees.

The KiraVan features Kevlar-reinforced tires, drones to monitor the upcoming terrain, and a 31 foot long trailer. This includes an eco-friendly bathroom, custom-designed kitchen, and a ‘penthouse’ loft that Kira helped design. Ferren is hoping to travel to the Mojave Desert, Canada and possibly even Europe in the vehicle to show Kira different sights.



Sources: Telegraph, Wired
Images: Telegraph, Wired

Categories: Trends

Traveling Adventure Fortress Designed For A 4-Year-Old

PSFK - Wed, 2014-04-16 13:30

Bran Ferren, the co-chairman of technology and design firm Applied Minds, has developed a high-tech adventure vehicle for his four-year-old daughter Kira that they can use for exploring. The millionaire inventor’s 23 ton RV, called the ‘KiraVan’, is a six-wheeled, all-terrain truck that can travel 2,000 miles without refueling and can traverse slopes of up to 45 degrees.

The KiraVan features Kevlar-reinforced tires, drones to monitor the upcoming terrain, and a 31 foot long trailer. This includes an eco-friendly bathroom, custom-designed kitchen, and a ‘penthouse’ loft that Kira helped design. Ferren is hoping to travel to the Mojave Desert, Canada and possibly even Europe in the vehicle to show Kira different sights.



Sources: Telegraph, Wired
Images: Telegraph, Wired

Categories: Trends

Virtual Eyeballs Take The Effort Out Of Being Social [Video]

PSFK - Wed, 2014-04-16 13:15

A Japanese researcher has developed a new type of wearable device that displays virtual eyes on its lenses so the wearer appears friendly, even if they’re actually feeling exhausted or are rolling their eyes in despair. Hirotaka Osawa, from Tsukuba University in Japan, has called the device ‘AgencyGlass’ and he hopes the technology will help increase people’s emotional comfort.

The virtual eyes follow movement, making it look like the wearer is being sociable and friendly when they’re too tired or busy. AgencyGlass has a gyroscope and accelerometer to detect head movement, and a camera to detect faces and motion.

There are a number of different features, such as when the wearer tilts their head back, the virtual eyes look up
so it seems as though they’re thinking, and if they nod or shake their head, the
eyes blink.

You can see the wearable device in action in the video below:

Source: IEEE Spectrum

Categories: Trends

Virtual Eyeballs Take The Effort Out Of Being Social [Video]

PSFK - Wed, 2014-04-16 13:15

A Japanese researcher has developed a new type of wearable device that displays virtual eyes on its lenses so the wearer appears friendly, even if they’re actually feeling exhausted or are rolling their eyes in despair. Hirotaka Osawa, from Tsukuba University in Japan, has called the device ‘AgencyGlass’ and he hopes the technology will help increase people’s emotional comfort.

The virtual eyes follow movement, making it look like the wearer is being sociable and friendly when they’re too tired or busy. AgencyGlass has a gyroscope and accelerometer to detect head movement, and a camera to detect faces and motion.

There are a number of different features, such as when the wearer tilts their head back, the virtual eyes look up
so it seems as though they’re thinking, and if they nod or shake their head, the
eyes blink.

You can see the wearable device in action in the video below:

Source: IEEE Spectrum

Categories: Trends

Aging Software Shows What Your Five-Year-Old Will Look Like At 80

PSFK - Wed, 2014-04-16 13:00


Besides being thankful for ten toes, ten fingers, and good health, parents can’t help but wonder what their youngsters will look like as teens and adults, and which pieces of family genetics will shine through. Computer scientists at the University of Washington have designed a novel piece of software that has the capability of showing how a child’s face will age throughout their lifetime and into their senior years.

Based off of a single photo, the technology automatically generates images by taking the average of thousands of faces of the exact same age and gender. The user can input any image from any angle with any expression, and will have the results in under 30 seconds. The software then scans the average pixel arrangement from a group of randomly selected web pictures and makes a calculation based on the alterations between the groups as they age, applying the changes to the new image.

While there are environmental and genetic inputs that this software can’t account for, the beginnings of a system that can accurately determine aging would be helpful in missing children’s cases and for scientific research.

Sources: Washington University, Wired

Categories: Trends
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